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New Picture (8)Tasmi Quazi is the Research Officer of Asiye eTafuleni (AeT). She has a master’s degree in Development Studies, and a background in architecture and design, particularly community-based approaches.  Her master’s thesis titled “Municipal Approaches to Incorporating the Informal Economy into the Urban Fabric: A Case Study of Msunduzi Local Municipality and Hibiscus Coast Municipality”  has been instrumental in her work at AeT as it has served to develop a systematic understanding of the institutional environment surrounding the governance of the informal economy.  Since AeT’s operational mandate is within the development realm of informal workers operating from public spaces, which is inherently a local government domain.  Equally, her work at AeT contributed practical knowledge to her master’s thesis.  Tasmi presented her thesis at the 2012 Municipal Institute of Learning (MILE) Symposium, which can be viewed here.  In addition, a paper she co-authored on AeT’s  Inner-City Cardboard Recycling Project was presented at this Symposium.

Picture by Dennis Stols

Tasmi Quazi presenting to local and international audiences at a Street Exhibition of the Inner-City Cardboard Recycling Project during COP 17

 

This is the personal reflection of her journey into AeT:

Throughout my years of formal education, I have kept a passion for serving the excluded and marginalised in society as part of an unyielding desire to address the troubling socio-economic inequalities that have plagued many countries that I have lived in or travelled to.  My undergraduate studies were in Architecture and Interior Design, in which I had sought to acquire the skills for strategising creative solutions to the challenges of underdevelopment. For my internship year, I worked at East Coast Architects, which specializes in sustainable practices of community based and environmentally sensitive design and building. It was a thoroughly enriching experience which deepened the need to understand the social, economic and political dynamics of development.

Consequently, I enrolled for the masters’ programme in Development Studies, at the distinguished School of Development Studies at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in 2008. My thesis explored municipal approaches to the informal economy by comparing the dynamics between a secondary city and a town. It was also during this time that I had been exposed to a wide range of research projects as practical learning opportunities offered by my lecturers.  This included an internship opportunity to work with the eThekwini Municipality’s Imagine Durban Project, which provided vital insight into local government processes and sustainable urban planning.

My current work for Asiye eTafuleni (AeT) is in the capacity of a Research Officer, which has crystallised my undergraduate and master’s studies, in Architecture and Design, and Development Studies respectively; with the challenge of tailoring urban planning and design solutions WITH the informal economy. The principled approach of the AeT team and its primary partners, urban informal workers, encompasses a remarkable dynamic of innovation through collaboration, which is not only pioneering – but utterly inspiring! 

Picture by Ntombifuthi Mnisi

An urgent informal street-side meeting with the Pine Street Recyclers of the Inner-city Cardboard Recycling Project

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  • Brian Mathebula

    says on:
    July 10, 2013 at 11:49 am

    Dear Tasmi,

    My name is Brian Mathebula, we interacted in 2011 and back then I was working at the City of Johannesburg regarding the proposed Informal Economy Policy for the City.

    Currently I am researcher working at the Studies in Poverty and Inequality Institute (SPII) and we are in the process of designing a pilot programe, which aims to address the chalenges of people who oeprate in the informal economy.

    I wanted to discusss our pilot programme, more improtantly designing interventions for those who operate in the Informal economy.

    Looking forward to a favourable response.

    Regards
    Brian

    • Tasmi Quazi

      says on:
      August 1, 2013 at 12:03 pm

      Sorry for the delayed response. Please feel free to call us at 031 3093880 or email me directly at tasmi@aet.org.za

      Your pilot programme falls within our ambit and sounds interesting, so I am sure we will have a lot to talk about.

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